Boerhaave syndrome

Boerhaave syndrome

Classification and external resources

Specialty
gastroenterology

ICD-10
K22.3

ICD-9-CM
530.4

DiseasesDB
9168

MedlinePlus
000231

eMedicine
med/233

MeSH
D004939

[edit on Wikidata]

Esophageal rupture is a rupture of the esophageal wall. Iatrogenic causes account for approximately 56% of esophageal perforations, usually due to medical instrumentation such as an endoscopy or paraesophageal surgery.[1] In contrast, the term Boerhaave’s syndrome is reserved for the 10% of esophageal perforations which occur due to vomiting.[2]
Spontaneous perforation of the esophagus most commonly results from a full-thickness tear in the esophageal wall due to a sudden increase in intraesophageal pressure combined with relatively negative intrathoracic pressure caused by straining or vomiting (effort rupture of the esophagus or Boerhaave’s syndrome). Other causes of spontaneous perforation include caustic ingestion, pill esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, infectious ulcers in patients with AIDS, and following dilation of esophageal strictures.[citation needed]
In most cases of Boerhaave’s syndrome, the tear occurs at the left postero-lateral aspect of the distal esophagus and extends for several centimeters. The condition is associated with high morbidity and mortality and is fatal without treatment. The occasionally nonspecific nature of the symptoms may contribute to a delay in diagnosis and a poor outcome. Spontaneous effort rupture of the cervical esophagus, leading to localized cervical perforation, may be more common than previously recognized and has a generally benign course. Preexisting esophageal disease is not a prerequisite for esophageal perforation but it contributes to increased mortality.[citation needed]
This condition was first documented by the 18th-century physician Herman Boerhaave, after whom it is named.[3][4] A related condition is Mallory-Weiss syndrome which is only a mucosal tear. In case of iatrogenic perforation common site is cervical esophagus just above the upper sphincter whereas spontaneous rupture as seen in Boerhaave’s syndrome perforation commonly occurs in the lower (1/3)rd of esophagus.[5]

Contents

1 Signs and symptoms

1.1 Differential diagnosis

2 Pathophysiology
3 Diagnosis
4 Treatment
5 References
6 External links

Signs and symptoms[edit]
The classic history of esophageal rupture is one of severe retching and vomiting followed by excruciating retrosternal chest and upper abdominal pain.